A Tunisian/ Maghrebi speciality, the pancake of a thousand holes, is good eating

by Rashmee

Posted on September 22, 2017


Yesterday, I ate a Tunisian/ Maghrebi speciality, the pancake of a thousand holes. That’s not a speciality for Ras el am el Hejri, the Islamic New Year which Tunisia celebrated on September 21. But the crepe mille-trous is called ghrayef or baghrir and is made of semolina. From what I can make out, the ghrayef is … Continue reading “A Tunisian/ Maghrebi speciality, the pancake of a thousand holes, is good eating”

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#fakefoods? Cauliflower rice, courgette noodles, almond milk

by Rashmee

Posted on May 29, 2017


Hands up if you’ve ever had a plate of cauliflower rice or a bowl of courgette noodles, washed down with a cup of almond milk. If US milk farmers and rice and pasta producers had their way it would be a crime to have bought and consumed those food items labeled in the way they … Continue reading “#fakefoods? Cauliflower rice, courgette noodles, almond milk”

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Yesterday, I ate my first cricket burger and it was a surprising whopper

by Rashmee

Posted on May 27, 2017


So I walk into my university cafeteria and find a pleasant young man offering free cricket burgers. I make a face and shake my head, but free is an unbeatable, nay irresistible price. “It’s like a vegetable burger really, you can’t taste the crickets,” says the young man. A waitress sees me hesitate and comes … Continue reading “Yesterday, I ate my first cricket burger and it was a surprising whopper”

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This Christmas it’s Tunis cake, British favourite that’s back in fashion

by Rashmee

Posted on December 25, 2015


The revival of Tunis cake is a puzzling thing. Not because it’s unpleasant – what’s not to like about chocolate ganache-covered Madeira sponge – but because of its name. Why does Britain have a cake that takes its name from the Tunisian capital? Is it because of the plentiful availability of ground almonds in Tunis?  … Continue reading “This Christmas it’s Tunis cake, British favourite that’s back in fashion”

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Tunisia marks Prophet’s birthday with a unique dessert, Assida zgougou

by Rashmee

Posted on December 23, 2015


Tomorrow, December 24, is the prophet’s birthday and Tunis is alive with anticipation. That it’s so close to Christmas is a once-in-a-435-years event. There are huge baskets in the supermarkets of zgougou, the black seeds of the Aleppo pine. On Mouled, the prophet’s birthday in colloquial Arabic, Tunisia cooks and eats its signature holiday dish, Assida zgougou. … Continue reading “Tunisia marks Prophet’s birthday with a unique dessert, Assida zgougou”

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Bologna’s food quarter: delicious heart of a delectable city

by Rashmee

Posted on September 16, 2015


Bologna’s food is almost as mind-blowing as the fact that its residents live and work and play in and around 1,000-year-old buildings. At 350 acres, Bologna’s historic centre is Europe’s second largest, with row upon row of medieval, renaissance and baroque buildings. So to the food. In Bologna, there is the Quadrilatero, a mediaeval food … Continue reading “Bologna’s food quarter: delicious heart of a delectable city”

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Three food joints that help you get Tunisia on a plate. Deliciously well

by Rashmee

Posted on September 14, 2015


In many ways, Tunisian food is simple. It offers, in the term often used to describe it, a “sun cuisine”. Olive oil, tomatoes and seafood feature pretty heavily. There is a great reliance on harissa, the dark red paste of spices, red chilli peppers and garlic. Some people add tomatoes to the mix. There’s lots … Continue reading “Three food joints that help you get Tunisia on a plate. Deliciously well”

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T is for tinned tuna though Tunisia has a long coast and lots of fresh fish

by Rashmee

Posted on September 11, 2015


What is it about Tunisians and tins of tuna? I’ve seen giant ones in the supermarkets, the sort that can take a kg of the stuff. It was the size of a brick – a round one that could conceivably be used as a doorstop. Till you opened it and consumed it. For Tunisians, that … Continue reading “T is for tinned tuna though Tunisia has a long coast and lots of fresh fish”

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The chapati is everywhere in Tunisia but no one knows how or why

by Rashmee

Posted on August 31, 2015


  No one is able to accurately say how the chapati has come to be one of Tunisia’s favourite street foods. Or when it arrived in this bit of north Africa. Or who brought it? And from where? I’ve heard someone insist that the chapati Tunisienne began life in Sousse, an hour-and-a-bit from the capital Tunis, … Continue reading “The chapati is everywhere in Tunisia but no one knows how or why”

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I say jalebi, Tunisia says z’labia. Could this Indian sweet really be Levantine?

by Rashmee

Posted on August 28, 2015


It was India’s ambassador in Tunisia, the charming, erudite and variously talented Nagma Malik who reminded me of the tangled mystery that is the origins of the jalebi. For those who know it, the jalebi is a fried Indian circle of dough dipped in syrup. It is best eaten hot. And in large quantities. The jalebi is … Continue reading “I say jalebi, Tunisia says z’labia. Could this Indian sweet really be Levantine?”

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Rashmee has lived and worked in several countries in the past decade, including Afghanistan, India, Haiti, Tunisia, the UAE, UK and US