Boston bomber chose America, yet lived to attack it. Why?

by Rashmee

Posted on April 19, 2013



Dzhokar, which would be prounounced Jauhar on the sub-continent, is an unlikely terror-inducing activist (terrorist)
Dzhokar, which would be prounounced Jauhar on the sub-continent, is an unlikely terror-inducing activist (terrorist)

The young face, framed by curls, looks out at people it never expected to see. Millions around the world really, now that Dzhokar Tsarnaev (whose first name is pronounced like the Hindustani Jauhar) has been captured by the Boston police in connection with the Marathon explosions.

Dzhokar was cornered late on Friday as he was hiding, wounded, armed and presumably desperate, on a boat in a backyard of Watertown, a suburb of Boston.

The real question though is why someone who emphatically chose America – as did Dzhokar, who came to the U.S. as a tourist with his family in the early 2000s and later asked for asylum, becoming a naturalized U.S. citizen in 2012 – should turn on his adopted country?

This is not a question one asks about Dzhokar’s older brother, the late Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who died in a shootout last night. He was not a naturalized citizen but he too was lawfully in the United States as a green-card holder.

Dzhokar was young and hopeful and presumably glad to be somewhere he could do whatever he wanted? Why did he turn on his adopted land?

Stuff happens? Is that enough of an explanation?

 

 

 

 


Rashmee has lived and worked in several countries in the past decade, including Afghanistan, India, Haiti, Tunisia, the UAE, US and UK

Enter your email address: