The Asian footprint (or perhaps that should read foodprint) is pronounced in Vancouver

by Rashmee

Posted on February 1, 2020


In most of my time in Vancouver, I ate richly and well of the foods of different countries in Asia. The first night was Vietnamese. The second day was Chinese (dim sum) and Japanese (sushi). There was “Indian Chinese” on day three and Indian Punjabi (chole bhature) on day four. And so it went. The … Continue reading “The Asian footprint (or perhaps that should read foodprint) is pronounced in Vancouver”

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Jerusalem in food, in pictures

by Rashmee

Posted on December 20, 2019


Resign yourself to it: unless you eat a falafel pitta sandwich (very good from the shop at Damascus Gate, opposite the bakery) or a couple of kibeh or a 15-shekel arayes, food is expensive in Jerusalem. We were shocked. The baker opposite the falafel shop at Damascus Gate sells four pitta for 5 shekel, which … Continue reading “Jerusalem in food, in pictures”

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India’s internet gag in Kashmir has completed 105 days

by Rashmee

Posted on November 18, 2019


India’s internet gag completed 105 days on Sunday, November 17. The Wire’s Mudasir Ahmed reported the milestone – if 105 days can be called a milestone, being neither a nice round number, nor particularly memorable. But the report came in the context of a different sort of milestone – Kashmir’s local government departments were restive. … Continue reading “India’s internet gag in Kashmir has completed 105 days”

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Donna Leon’s ‘Acqua Alta’ paints a pretty good picture of high waters in Venice

by Rashmee

Posted on November 13, 2019


I was at work today when I read about Venice under water, its walkable streets flooded, tables and chairs set out for touristy aperitifs bobbing along alleyways, and the gangways of hotels along the Grand Canal washed away. It’s the “acqua alta” or high waters, but an exceptionally intense one. This one has peaked at … Continue reading “Donna Leon’s ‘Acqua Alta’ paints a pretty good picture of high waters in Venice”

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The UK’s general election is the most unpredictable in a generation

by Rashmee

Posted on October 31, 2019 / Quartz


Britain will vote on December 12, the first election in that month since 1923, the third in four years, and a contest that is likely to be the most unpredictable in a generation. There are two main reasons for this: an increasingly fickle electorate, and someone election strategists are calling “Workington Man.” The term appears … Continue reading “The UK’s general election is the most unpredictable in a generation”

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Hong Kong, Paris and Santiago are relatively rich but restive. A development economist explains why

by Rashmee

Posted on October 30, 2019


I’m rivetted by Jeffrey Sachs’ analysis of why rich cities rebel. Paris, Hong Kong and Santiago, he recently pointed out, have been unquiet, mutinous places this year mostly because they’re burdened by “a sense of unfairness”. Quite. How and why is this the case? According to Professor Sachs, who teaches sustainable development at Columbia University, … Continue reading “Hong Kong, Paris and Santiago are relatively rich but restive. A development economist explains why”

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To beat climate change, cities would have to shrink to the size of ancient Rome

by Rashmee

Posted on August 30, 2019


Greta Thunberg, the Swedish schoolgirl climate activist, took a yacht across the Atlantic rather than fly. It wasn’t exactly fun–there was no hot food or a loo on the boat–but the 16-year-old wanted to send a message. She, and anyone else who cares about their carbon footprint, should re-examine transport choices carefully. Those of us … Continue reading “To beat climate change, cities would have to shrink to the size of ancient Rome”

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To tackle climate change, we must first address the crisis in coverage

by Rashmee

Posted on June 18, 2019 / The National


This summer India experienced an intense heatwave that broke temperature records and affected two-thirds of the country. Even Finland has sweltered in weeks past, with the town of Oulu — just a degree shy of the Arctic Circle — registering 32.3°C in the first week of June. Meanwhile, parts of the American Midwest that were said to flood only … Continue reading “To tackle climate change, we must first address the crisis in coverage”

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Hope is a far more powerful force than confrontation when it comes to climate change

by Rashmee

Posted on April 24, 2019 / The National


Extinction Rebellion has a point but should stop presenting the eco-warrior as an anarchist For more than a week, a group called Extinction Rebellion (XR) has brought parts of London to a standstill, conducting sit-ins and blocking traffic. Activists belonging to the group glued themselves to trains and buildings; nearly 1,000 protesters were arrested. While … Continue reading “Hope is a far more powerful force than confrontation when it comes to climate change”

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What the reaction to Notre Dame does and does not say

by Rashmee

Posted on April 21, 2019 / The Arab Weekly


Arabs may have lost much of their faith in the value of their heritage after they lost adequate appreciation of the value of lives in their midst. Some have taken the massive fire that destroyed the roof and spire of the 856-year-old Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris as a sign; others as a warning. … Continue reading “What the reaction to Notre Dame does and does not say”

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Rashmee has lived and worked in several countries in the past decade, including Afghanistan, India, Haiti, Tunisia, the UAE, US and UK