Bird flu. SARS. Coronavirus. Why do so many diseases start in China?

by Rashmee

Posted on February 11, 2020


More than 30 years ago, there was bird flu. In 2003, it was SARS. And now, Coronavirus. Why do so many diseases start in China? It’s a question worth asking now that scientists are suggesting that the world’s only scaly mammal, the pangolin, may have been the intermediate host that transmitted coronavirus from bats to humans. … Continue reading “Bird flu. SARS. Coronavirus. Why do so many diseases start in China?”

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The FT’s tech editor wants to dump his WiFi speakers and return to an old amp and a few wires. Here’s why

by Rashmee

Posted on January 29, 2020


You want a perfect example of our unsustainable way of life, with consumption and waste built into the growth model? Read Chris Nuttall, the Financial Times’s technology editor. He recently described his travails with the speakers he has long used in his home wireless system. Mr Nuttall said he used to be in favour of … Continue reading “The FT’s tech editor wants to dump his WiFi speakers and return to an old amp and a few wires. Here’s why”

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Davos was meatless yesterday. It probably wasn’t entirely a gimmick

by Rashmee

Posted on January 23, 2020


  My recent Swissair flight to Jerusalem served three kinds of meals: vegetarian, kosher and Hindu. The last two needed to be ordered ahead. If you didn’t, you got the standard meal, which was vegetarian. (So were the kosher and Hindu meals, which were only distinct in the special method of preparation or the distinct … Continue reading “Davos was meatless yesterday. It probably wasn’t entirely a gimmick”

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Saturday rearview: How the world made it harder to be good in 2019

by Rashmee

Posted on December 28, 2019


The week was rich in sights, sounds – and tastes – of Israel and the Palestinian Territories. And then there was a piece I wrote with Jason Karaian  in Quartz about how the world in 2019 made it harder to be a good person. Think about it: you can’t fly, buy fast fashion, anything plastic, … Continue reading “Saturday rearview: How the world made it harder to be good in 2019”

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All the ways the world made it harder to be a good person in 2019

by Rashmee

Posted on December 27, 2019 / Quartz


By Rashmee Roshan Lall & Jason Karaian There is a moment in season three of the American comedy television series The Good Place in which Michael, the lead protagonist, has an epiphany about the problem with modern life. “Every day,” he says, “the world gets a little more complicated, and being a good person gets a little harder.” … Continue reading “All the ways the world made it harder to be a good person in 2019”

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Kimchi diplomacy: how national cuisine brings more than just food to the table

by Rashmee

Posted on December 23, 2019 / The National


As the season of festivities and end-of-year feasting approaches, here is a question worth asking: which countries feed the world? By that I mean: which countries provide the food that reaches restaurant tables abroad? In other words, whose food might you and your family and friends be eating if you go out for a meal? … Continue reading “Kimchi diplomacy: how national cuisine brings more than just food to the table”

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Jerusalem in food, in pictures

by Rashmee

Posted on December 20, 2019


Resign yourself to it: unless you eat a falafel pitta sandwich (very good from the shop at Damascus Gate, opposite the bakery) or a couple of kibeh or a 15-shekel arayes, food is expensive in Jerusalem. We were shocked. The baker opposite the falafel shop at Damascus Gate sells four pitta for 5 shekel, which … Continue reading “Jerusalem in food, in pictures”

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Could the demise of Thomas Cook mark a new beginning for the tourism industry?

by Rashmee

Posted on October 25, 2019 / Equal Times


Some big and startling numbers have been thrown about in the grim aftermath of Thomas Cook’s collapse. Roughly 600,000 tourists were left stranded when the world’s oldest travel company ceased trading on 23 September 2019. The United Kingdom began its biggest ever peacetime repatriation of 150,000 holidaymakers. At least 21,000 people worldwide lost their jobs. … Continue reading “Could the demise of Thomas Cook mark a new beginning for the tourism industry?”

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As the rich get richer, tackling inequality is a global struggle

by Rashmee

Posted on October 17, 2019


Thursday is International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. The UN-designated day has been around for more than three decades but is arguably much less widely marked or well-known than, for example, International Women’s Day, World Water Day or the International Day of Peace. But the eradication of poverty should, by rights, be the biggest … Continue reading “As the rich get richer, tackling inequality is a global struggle”

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‘Firstism’ doesn’t conflict with globalism. Here’s why

by Rashmee

Posted on September 20, 2019


Dani Rodrik, Harvard professor of international political economy, has suggested something one might scarcely believe to be possible: The rich world can emphasize domestic equity without being harmful to the global poor. How? Isn’t that what the so-called people’s politics was about? Weren’t Donald Trump, the Brexit brigade, Marine Le Pen, and suchlike, supposed to … Continue reading “‘Firstism’ doesn’t conflict with globalism. Here’s why”

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Rashmee has lived and worked in several countries in the past decade, including Afghanistan, India, Haiti, Tunisia, the UAE, US and UK