3-person babies & the need to rethink eugenics. Not about playing god

by Rashmee

Posted on January 31, 2015


Now that MPs are to vote on whether Britain should become the first country in the world to permit strictly controlled clinical trials of “three-parent” babies“, it’s time to re-consider eugenics. No one would ever blame their parents for giving them a strong set of genes. So why not do so?” asks OZY. It’s a compelling … Continue reading “3-person babies & the need to rethink eugenics. Not about playing god”

Read More

The digital road is the only way towards faster, holistic development

by Rashmee

Posted on January 28, 2015


Bjørn Lomborg recommends the digital road out of poverty as for the developing world. Mr Lomborg should know or at least should be able to make a pretty good guess. He’s an adjunct professor at the Copenhagen Business School and has written copiously – and controversially – about the world’s problems (not least climate change and … Continue reading “The digital road is the only way towards faster, holistic development”

Read More

American fat cats aren’t financing trust fund babies in the way some think

by Rashmee

Posted on December 30, 2014


Even though Thomas Piketty said it, the facts don’t support the theory that inheritance has accounted for an increasing share of household wealth and is exacerbating inequality in America. That’s what NYU economics professor Edward N. Wolff says. He should know. His new book deals with exactly that subject. It is titled ‘Inheriting Wealth in … Continue reading “American fat cats aren’t financing trust fund babies in the way some think”

Read More

The internet has reduced inequality but this is not recorded. Yet

by Rashmee

Posted on December 12, 2014


An Indian cabbie in Abu Dhabi unwittingly illustrates Berkeley economics professor J. Bradford DeLong ‘s theory that rapid technological change has diminished inequality in ways that conventional measures don’t take into account. The cabbie told me he found it really cheap to run an internet connection here in Abu Dhabi. “It’s wireless and I told all my neighbours … Continue reading “The internet has reduced inequality but this is not recorded. Yet”

Read More

We’re too smart to buy excessively clever washing machines. Here’s why

by Rashmee

Posted on December 5, 2014


Consumers, ie all of us, seem to be too smart to buy excessively clever washing machines. Especially if they cost $1,699 and are only good for telling you by email or text that your clothes are ready to dry. As a Washington Post blog recently quoted a tech trends observer to say, “Have we gotten … Continue reading “We’re too smart to buy excessively clever washing machines. Here’s why”

Read More

America’s schools, like its best companies, need CEOs. Here’s why

by Rashmee

Posted on October 21, 2014


Jean Desravines, chief executive officer of an American nonprofit that focuses on developing transformational school leaders, believes that high school principals are CEOs and should be regarded as such. Why not, I suppose, considering even a country can now presume to have a CEO (Afghanistan indeed). But Mr Desravines seems to suggest that it’s more … Continue reading “America’s schools, like its best companies, need CEOs. Here’s why”

Read More

Only in London Town: Everything costs twice as much as everywhere else

by Rashmee

Posted on October 8, 2014


Simon Kelner, columnist for The Independent, tells a salutary story. Gathering with some other “metropolitan types” in Hull, he ordered a round of drinks and reached into his wallet expecting to pay twice as much as it cost. £9.40 in Hull, versus £20.40 in London. Unsurprising revelation, considering London is now officially the world’s most … Continue reading “Only in London Town: Everything costs twice as much as everywhere else”

Read More

The beauty of urban ‘tangle’: Best observed in London, not Port au Prince

by Rashmee

Posted on July 27, 2014


Will Wiles needs to come to Port au Prince. He lives in London, writes about architecture and design and his debut novel won a Betty Trask award. Clearly, a man of ability and discernment. So why is he arguing against the urge to tidy up cities? What’s wrong with a bit of order? Port au … Continue reading “The beauty of urban ‘tangle’: Best observed in London, not Port au Prince”

Read More

Why the Piketty guide to inequality is so perfectly matched to its moment

by Rashmee

Posted on June 5, 2014


J. Bradford DeLong, former deputy assistant secretary of the US Treasury and now professor of economics at Berkeley, swears that this is the very best review ever of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century. It’s Larry Summers’ review and was published in ‘Democracy Journal’. Professor DeLong is quite right. It is a superb review. … Continue reading “Why the Piketty guide to inequality is so perfectly matched to its moment”

Read More

Bhutan balances mindfulness with modernization. Guess which one’s winning

by Rashmee

Posted on May 2, 2014


The Taj Tashi in Thimphu, Bhutan, is probably one of the most beautiful hotels in the world. It is certainly one of the most remarkable hotels that I’ve stayed at in any of roughly 150 cities I’ve visited. The Taj Tashi’s beauty lies not in grandeur but in its manifest sense of harmony. Its décor … Continue reading “Bhutan balances mindfulness with modernization. Guess which one’s winning”

Read More

Rashmee has lived and worked in several countries in the past decade, including Afghanistan, India, Haiti, Tunisia, the UAE, US and UK